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The following articles will be published in the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

66(3): 4 (PDF/A 1253 KBytes) published online: July 28 2017
image -66(3)4 My Pretoria Garden [Christo van Wijk].jpg- is missing! My Pretoria Garden
    Christo van Wijk
I am situated next to the Bronberg Mountain in Pretoria. The most severe frost doesn’t hit here, but rather settles closer to the highway that is about 400m from and 40m lower than me! Winter temperatures are usually within the range of 2-23 °C (although we have had freak cold spells with temperatures dipping to -4 °C), with the coldest period in the two months of June and July. Minimum daily temperatures are encountered during the hours between 1 and 4 am, and even during the coldest months are seldom below 10 °C when the sun is out. Summer temperatures are usually 18-42 °C....
66(3): 3 (PDF/A 846 KBytes) published online: July 28 2017
image -66(3)3 Bromeliad Systematics - Stepping Back to move Forward [Gregory K. Brown].jpg- is missing! Bromeliad Systematics - Stepping Back to move Forward
    Gregory K. Brown
The taxonomic framework and understanding of diversity and relationships within the Bromeliaceae is based on, and has been influenced by, the works and contributions from scores of individuals over at least the past 300 years. These individuals include explorer-collectors, horticulturists, hobbyists, naturalists, students, artists, professional botanists, and other scientists. When considering this spectrum of contributions, with special attention given to the many important ones (e.g., Linneaus, 1762; Baker 1889, Rauh, 1979; Benzing, 2000; Givinish et al., 2007), I consider three sets of contributions, Baker (1889), Mez (1896, 1935), and Smith & Downs (1974, 1977, 1979) to be monumental milestones for Bromeliaceae Systematics. ....
66(3): 2 (PDF/A 1031 KBytes) published online: May 12 2017
image -66(3)2 Spots in Neoregelia [Alan Herndon].jpg- is missing! Spots in Neoregelia
    Alan Herndon
In several spotted hybrids, the spots are large and bold. They also frequently overlap, leading to splotches of color with irregular borders - and often, no hint of their circular origins.
66(3): 1 (PDF/A 2647 KBytes) published online: May 03 2017
image -66(3)1 A few Conference memories [Lyn Wegner].jpg- is missing! A few Conference memories
    Lyn Wegner
I attended my first World Conference in 2008, in Cairns Australia, the first WBC to be held outside the US. I had mentioned some months previously to a friend that it was a dream of mine to attend a bromeliad world conference. She replied 'so why don't you?'
66(2): 7 (PDF/A 791 KBytes) published online: May 12 2017
image -66(2)7 2018 World Bromeliad Conference [Scott Sandel].jpg- is missing! 2018 World Bromeliad Conference
    Scott Sandel
Join us in San Diego, California for the 23rd World Bromeliad Conference – “Fiesta de las Bromelias”, May 29 - June 3, 2018. Planning for the 2018 conference is well underway. As a venue, we have secured the fantastic bayside resort Paradise Point which is close to San Diego restaurants, parks, attractions and the airport. We hope that you will plan on joining us for an exciting bromeliad extravaganza. There are several bromeliad growers and nurseries within striking distance, and there are both public and private gardens to see.
66(2): 6 (PDF/A 3414 KBytes) published online: May 12 2017
image -66(2)6 In Honour of Franz Georg Gruber (Part 1) In search of a very special bromeliad Goudaea ospinae var. gruberi Luther [Peter Tristram].jpg- is missing! In Honour of Franz Georg Gruber (Part 1) In search of a very special bromeliad Goudaea ospinae var. gruberi Luther
    Peter Tristram
Confused with the title? That’s because the new genus, Goudaea, was recently created for a small group of Andean Vriesea species based on a phylogenetic analysis of molecular (DNA) data followed by mapping newly reassessed morphological characters onto the final trees. The two species are Goudaea ospinae and Goudaea chrysostachys, including the recognised varieties in each. Considering what a typical Vriesea flower looks like, think of Vriesea carinata or V. fosteriana, then it’s no wonder G. ospinae and G. chrysostachys had to be moved into their own genus. They are quite unique and more closely related to Cipuropsis amicorum and Zizkaea tuerkheimii, both ex-Vriesea as well!
66(2): 4 (PDF/A 1358 KBytes) published online: May 03 2017
image -66(2)4 A new species of Cipuropsis, and some remarks about this recently resurrected genus[Eric J. Gouda].jpg- is missing! A new species of Cipuropsis, and some remarks about this recently resurrected genus
    Eric J. Gouda
Recently the genus Cipuropsis (Vrieseeae) was resurrected in the revision of the Tillandsioideae by Barfuss et al. (2016) as a monotypic genus containing only the type species, Cipuropsis subandina Ule (1907). No species were transferred to the genus by Barfuss et al., mainly because this species could not be included in the study because the type could not be investigated phylogenetically, it is not in cultivation and known from the type collection and a few additional collections only.
66(2): 3 (PDF/A 826 KBytes) published online: May 03 2017
image -66(2)3 Notes on the floral biology, seed morphology and post-seminal development of Vriesea minarum L.B.Sm., an endangered Bromeliaceae of Southeastern Brazil [Pâmela Lavor et al.].jpg- is missing! Notes on the floral biology, seed morphology and post-seminal development of Vriesea minarum L.B.Sm., an endangered Bromeliaceae of Southeastern Brazil
    Pâmela Lavor et al.
Vriesea minarum is a bromeliad endemic to the Iron Quadrangle region in Minas Gerais state, Brazil and is currently listed as an endangered species. The aim of our study was to investigate the species floral biology, breeding system, and post-seminal development. Observations and experiments were conducted in the Rola-Moça State Park. Flowers have morphological characteristics typical for the genus but we discuss the position of the ovary, oversimplified in some papers as superior. Seed set indicates that V. minarum is predominantly outcrossing, but self-compatible as well. The floral biology indicates flower protandry, and suggests a mixed pollination syndrome, as was observed recently in other bromeliads. Due to the survival risk facing this species, we suggest that more studies investigating the potential to preserve germplasm should be conducted, since its seeds appear to have a limited viability
66(2): 2 (PDF/A 803 KBytes) published online: May 03 2017
image -66(2)2 The Search for Irish Bromeliads [Jay Thurrott].jpg- is missing! The Search for Irish Bromeliads
    Jay Thurrott
Ireland is not a country where you would ordinarily expect to find many bromeliads. When I recently told friends that Calandra and I would be travelling to Ireland and they asked why?, my response was 'to look for Irish bromeliads!' I wasn’t being serious about it of course and certainly didn’t expect to see any tropical plants during our visit, much less any bromeliads, but it wasn’t long after we arrived in Dublin before we spotted our first bromeliads. A street corner vendor offering cut flowers and potted plants for sale included a tray of very healthy looking, yellow blooming guzmanias (see photo above) in his wares - our first 'sighting', although not particularly remarkable.


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