BSI Logo


Members Only Content 


The following articles will be published in the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

JBS (PDF/A 912 KBytes) published online: November 27 2018
image -JBS 68(1)57-60 Offsets in the Inflorescence! [A Very Amateur Botanist].jpg- is missing! 68(1)57-60 Offsets in the Inflorescence!
    A Very Amateur Botanist
During my short time of involvement with bromeliads I have been intrigued with some of the growth habits which are evident from different genera and species within these groups. In particular, the Tillandsia group which seems to produce some very different characteristics during flowering and the subsequent forming of offsets. My main interest at present is with the plants that produce offsets on the inflorescence. Some I have witnessed produce offsets from the base of the flowers on along stem consistently. For example, T. somnians and T. secunda (to name but a few) seem to support this habit (Figs. 1, 2 & 3) Also, T. ‘Halley’s Comet’, which is believed to be a cultivar of T. baileyi, consistently produces offsets on the inflorescence in addition to those at the base of the plant.
JBS (PDF/A 2061 KBytes) published online: November 26 2018
image -JBS 68(1)45-56 The Epiphytic Bromeliad Flora of the RTP Cerros Negro-Yucaño, Oaxaca, Mexico [Nayeli Gomez-Escamilla et al.].jpg- is missing! 68(1)45-56 The Epiphytic Bromeliad Flora of the RTP Cerros Negro-Yucaño, Oaxaca, Mexico
    Nayeli Gomez-Escamilla et al.
Oaxaca is one of the Mexican states with highest plant species richness (García-Mendoza & Meave 2011, Villaseñor 2016), hosting about 10,000 taxa of vascular plants. The Bromeliaceae family is represented in Oaxaca by 184 species, which corresponds to 44% of the Mexican bromeliad flora (Espejo-Serna et al. 2007, Espejo-Serna & López-Ferrari 2018). About 29% (53 spp.) and 67% (124 spp.) of these species are endemic to the state and to the country, respectively.
JBS (PDF/A 1201 KBytes) published online: November 20 2018
image -JBS 68(1)40-44 Understanding the Basis of Drought Tolerance in Bromeliads [Jamie Males].jpg- is missing! 68(1)40-44 Understanding the Basis of Drought Tolerance in Bromeliads
    Jamie Males
In 2015 I was fortunate enough to be awarded the Harry E. Luther – Bromeliad Society International Scholarship to undertake a period of research at the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in support of my doctoral studies at the University of Cambridge (UK). My work is focussed on the water relations of the Bromeliaceae, and the interface between physiology, anatomy and evolution. During the course of my PhD, I became aware of the potential value of conducting a survey across the bromeliad family of a physiological parameter known as the turgor loss point (TLP). TLP has been increasingly recognised over recent years as a key determinant of cellular drought tolerance across plant groups
JBS (PDF/A 2685 KBytes) published online: November 05 2018
image -JBS 68(1)26-39 Bromeliad Treasure Hunting in Peru - Part 2 [Eric and Renate Gouda].jpg- is missing! 68(1)26-39 Bromeliad Treasure Hunting in Peru - Part 2
    Eric and Renate Gouda
From the mountain ridge, the descent to Yurimaguas was quite a ride - one we were to become familiar with over the next several days. We would drive out from Tarapoto (400 m), immediately start climbing through the montane forest, drive through the forest over the pass (ca. 1050 m) and eventually make a descent into the flatlands of the Amazonian basin (200 m). Yurimaguas was still about an hour away by car. Each day we could drive to a side road that allowed us to explore a new area, or stop along the main road to study an area - or even a clump of plants - that attracted our interest. At the end of the day, we would retrace our path over the main road back to Tarapoto.
68(1): 21-25 (PDF/A 879 KBytes) published online: October 31 2018
image -68(1)21-25 Tillandsia, Wonders of Nature - An Italian exhibition event [Andrea Oldrini].jpg- is missing! Tillandsia, Wonders of Nature - An Italian exhibition event
    Andrea Oldrini
Despite their beauty, elegance and charm, tillandsias (and bromeliads in general) still have a diminished popularity in Italy, compared to other botanical families, such as orchids, cacti, succulents and so on. Moreover, in Italy it is hard to find any associations that systematically deal with these plants2 and promote the opportunity to admire and learn about them. Recently, tillandsias have begun re-appearing after some decades of substantial anonymity to most people. When I first started collecting and studying this genus about ten years ago, I only discovered them by chance, while visiting an exposition of other rare plants.

Accessed from 12-03-2018 [1408x]
Send comments, corrections and suggestions to: webmaster@bsi.org
© 2019 Bromeliad Society International, All Rights Reserved.
All images copyrighted BSI or their respective owners.