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The following articles will be published in the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

JBS (PDF/A 329 KBytes) published online: January 21 2020
image -JBS 69(1) First description of the nocturnal flowers of [Cascante M. et al.].jpg- is missing! 69(1) First description of the nocturnal flowers of
    Cascante M. et al.
First description of the nocturnal flowers of the little-knownWerauhia haberi (Tillandsioideae) and notes about its naturalhistory - Alfredo Cascante-Marin, Christian Trejos & Juan Francisco Morales - Flowers have a central role in sexual reproduction of higher plants and their morphology provides essential information for taxonomists. The ephemeral and delicate design of flowers often prevents their proper preservation in botanical specimens. Flowers lose their characteristic morphology after pressing and drying, reducing their utility for plant identification. The nocturnal behavior and short life-span of some flowers prevent collection of fully-opened flowers during day time when botanists usually perform their duties. Because of this, floral morphology of some rare and poorly collected bromeliad species has been scarcely documented and, in some cases, it is unknown at all. Knowledge of floral structure is relevant for the proper placement of species in its taxonomic group and in understanding the reproductive ecology and phylogenetic relationships.
JBS (PDF/A 1457 KBytes) published online: December 17 2019
image -JBS 68(4) 236-253 World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 2 [Juliana Raposo].jpg- is missing! 68(4) 236-253 World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 2
    Juliana Raposo
After a beautiful morning perusing the bromeliads at the show, we headed to the buses for our first garden tour. Our destination was San Diego's North County, home to some of the best gardens in town. First visited was Dan Kinnard and Eloise Lau's home in Vista. The couple’s house boasts unique organic architecture by James Hubbell and first-class art by the homeowners (Fig 34), all of which are worth the trek even for non-bromeliophyles. On arrival, a spread of Dan's yummy baked goodies was a treat one could not pass by (Fig. 35). In the garden, hardy terrestrials like Puya, Hechtia and Dyckia grow on the hillsides among fruit trees, while a spacious shadehouse hosts the more tender plants. Dan and Eloise have a beautiful all-around bromeliad collection, but I specially admire their billbergias.
JBS (PDF/A 233 KBytes) published online: December 17 2019
image -JBS 68(4) 230-235 Eric J. Gouda, 2018 Recipient of the BSI s Wally Berg [Theresa M. Bert, Geoff Lawn, and Lyn Wegner].jpg- is missing! 68(4) 230-235 Eric J. Gouda, 2018 Recipient of the BSI s Wally Berg
    Theresa M. Bert, Geoff Lawn, and Lyn Wegner
At each Bromeliad Society International (BSI) conference, the BSI’s highest award, the Wally Berg Award of Excellence, is given to a specialist in bromeliads. The expert must be internationally renowned in at least four of seven areas specified in the call for nominations for the award (Bert, 2017). At the 2018 BSI World Conference, Eric Gouda received the award. In the bromeliad world, Eric has many professional achievements and has volunteered his time and expertise for more than three decades. Despite his busy work schedule, he has routinely assisted when needed, often at an international level. Eric’s areas of expertise include bromeliad ecology, taxonomy, culture, and identification. Eric is also skilled in developing and maintaining websites and in computer programming.
JBS (PDF/A 1338 KBytes) published online: December 17 2019
image -JBS 68(4) 206-224 South-West Colombia is open for Visitors [Bruce Dunstan].jpg- is missing! 68(4) 206-224 South-West Colombia is open for Visitors
    Bruce Dunstan
In May 2018, I had the pleasure to travel with Carla Black and Angel Rodriguez to Nariño in south-west Colombia. Last year, we were in north-west Ecuador looking across the river into Colombia, wondering what might be growing there. This year we had a good look around and found some interesting plants. Nariño department has had its issues with security in the past few decades and travelling there hasn’t been recommended. With the peace agreement now in place, times have changed and we had only positive experiences in the time we spent there.
JBS (PDF/A 386 KBytes) published online: December 17 2019
image -JBS 68(4) 202-205 Guzmania bicolor L.B.Sm. vs. Guzmania gracilior (Andre) Mez [Eric Gouda].jpg- is missing! 68(4) 202-205 Guzmania bicolor L.B.Sm. vs. Guzmania gracilior (Andre) Mez
    Eric Gouda
In an earlier article (Gouda 2016) I mis-identified a background plant as Guzmania bicolor (Smith 1966). The plant in the background of figure 5 on page 203 of that article is actually G. gracilior (André) (Mez 1896). They are mainly distinguished by their leaf length and width, but there are some more differences. In the table below the two descriptions are compared with the important differences shown in bold.
JBS (PDF/A 311 KBytes) published online: December 17 2019
image -JBS 68(4) 196-201 Pitcairnia orchidifolia a nice, small and easy species worth growing [Eric Gouda].jpg- is missing! 68(4) 196-201 Pitcairnia orchidifolia a nice, small and easy species worth growing
    Eric Gouda
Pitcairnia orchidifolia Mez (1921) is an attractive not too large and easy to grow species for bromeliad collectors. It has a nice soft foliage and beautiful flower color, with petals that start out yellow, but become partly to fully red at anthesis (Fig. 1, see also Fig. 4). It seems to grow well under humid and shady conditions in cultivation. Leaves are very densely white lepidote on the lower surface only, contrasting with the glabrous upper side (Fig. 2). There is another name involved with this species, which is Pitcairnia grafii Rauh (Rauh 1988). Specimens of P. orchidifolia key out to P. platypetala in Smith & Downs (1974) - at least if you take the key to subgenus Pepinia. In the same work, P. orchidifolia is found in Key 2. under subgenus Pitcairnia, and possibly escaped Rauh’s attention for that reason. Instead, Rauh compared P. grafii to P. platypetala in his original diagnosis. Distinguishing characters listed by Rauh for P. grafii are also found in specimens of P. orchidifolia so the two species are here treated as conspecific.
JBS (PDF/A 1091 KBytes) published online: September 17 2019
image -JBS 68(3)171-178 Notes and photos from the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand s annual Fiesta Show and Sale, 2018 [Graeme Barclay].jpg- is missing! 68(3)171-178 Notes and photos from the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand s annual Fiesta Show and Sale, 2018
    Graeme Barclay
The annual competitive show and major sale of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, known as the ‘Fiesta’, takes place in mid February each year in Auckland, the largest city in the North Island of New Zealand. In this year 2018, the dates were February 17th and 18th, with the usual city council War Memorial Hall in Mount Eden (a central city suburb) hired for three days. Friday was set-up day for the plant show, bromeliad display and sales tables, then the doors open to visitors from 9am to 3pm on both Saturday and Sunday.
JBS (PDF/A 576 KBytes) published online: September 09 2019
image -JBS 68(3)132-133 World Bromeliad Conference 2020, Sarasota, Florida [Greg Kolojeski and Marion Kennell].jpg- is missing! 68(3)132-133 World Bromeliad Conference 2020, Sarasota, Florida
    Greg Kolojeski and Marion Kennell
The World Bromeliad Conference 2020 will be held in Sarasota, Florida, USA from Tuesday, June 9, 2020 through Saturday, June 13, 2020 at the Hyatt Regency Sarasota. We will celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the Bromeliad Society International! Events will include tours of two of the world’s leading Bromeliad nurseries (Michael’s Bromeliads and Tropiflora) and a visit to the renowned Marie Selby Botanical Gardens (with free admission for conference registrants) home garden visits and much more.
JBS (PDF/A 2900 KBytes) published online: September 04 2019
image -JBS 68(3)105-168 World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 1 [Juliana Raposo].jpg- is missing! 68(3)105-168 World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 1
    Juliana Raposo
May 2018 - The World Bromeliad Conference 2018 was hosted by the San Diego Bromeliad Society (SDBS). This was the third WBC hosted by San Diego after hosting similar events in 1994 and 2006. Our logo (Fig. 1), featuring a Neoregelia, became a constant part of our lives during the months of preparation. The venue was Paradise Point, a tropical-themed island resort in the middle of San Diego Bay. A lush landscape, bay views (Fig. 2), and beautiful outdoor spaces set BSI’s bi-annual gathering to a great start. All social functions and lectures were held in a great room facing the bay, and the large deck surrounding it was the perfect spot to mingle. The adjacent sales and show pavilion, a large tent-like structure, was bathed in natural light and ocean breezes (Fig. 3). There was plenty of room for vendors and show displays alike.
JBS (PDF/A 709 KBytes) published online: July 09 2019
image -JBS 68(3) The Floridian Fasciculata [Dennis Cathcart].jpg- is missing! 68(3) The Floridian Fasciculata
    Dennis Cathcart
Tillandsia fasciculata is a plant of stunning diversity with an impressive international range. Many, many differentlooking forms exist, some restricted to single habitats. Some forms are so widespread that one would be hard pressed to guess their country of origin. Not so the Floridian fasciculata. Any Tillandsia enthusiast could likely identify a plant from Florida. They are among the most beautiful and variable representatives of the species found anywhere ...
JBS (PDF/A 929 KBytes) published online: July 12 2019
image -JBS 68(3) Notes on the Androlepis Alliance, a lineage of Bromelioideae [Ramirez et al.].jpg- is missing! 68(3) Notes on the Androlepis Alliance, a lineage of Bromelioideae
    Ramirez et al.
Before the advent of DNA sequencing, classifications of plants in general, and of Bromeliaceae in particular, were primarily based on morphological characters observed in herbarium specimens (e.g. Smith & Downs, 1974, 1977, 1979). These classification systems were easy to use because they tended to be based on macroscopic features, such as shapes of floral bracts, sepals, and presence or absence of petal appendages. With the advance of methods for phylogenetic reconstruction and relying on different character sources, especially DNA sequences, we realize, that many of the groupings based solely upon conspicuous morphological features resulted in many artificial classifications, composed by species that do not share a recent common ancestors and have different evolutionary histories (what are known as non-monophyletic groups) (Faria et al., 2004; Schulte et al., 2005, 2009; Schulte & Zizka, 2008; Sass & Specht, 2010; Evans et al., 2015). It is well known that morphological similarities could result from different phenomena, such as evolutionary convergence, where identical or almost identical structures occur in species with different evolutionary histories. This phenomenon, which has probably taken place many times in bromeliads, coupled with the limited knowledge that we have about the origin of many structures used in the taxonomic classifications, are some of the problems that obscure our classifications based on monophyletic groups.
JBS (PDF/A 818 KBytes) published online: June 29 2019
image -JBS 68(3) A New Species of Racinaea (Tillandsioideae - Bromeliaceae) from Ecuador [Jose Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(3) A New Species of Racinaea (Tillandsioideae - Bromeliaceae) from Ecuador
    Jose Manzanares
Forestry engineer Nelson Jaramillo de Loja conducted his undergraduate researchon the emission of methane through bromeliad tanks at the San Francisco ResearchStation, Zamora Chinchipe, Ecuador. During the investigation he had the opportunityto study many bromeliads from the Scientific Station. When contacting me toidentify the species studied, I was struck by a species of Racinaea related to R. lutheriManzanares & Till and R. contorta (Mez) M.A.Spencer & L.B.Sm. After further study,the plant collected by Jaramillo, it turned out to be a new species that is presented andillustrated in the following article....

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