BSI Logo


Members Only Content 


The following articles will be published in the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

JBS_V68(3): 171-178 (PDF/A 1091 KBytes) published online: September 17 2019
image -JBS_V68(3)171-178 Notes and photos from the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand’s annual ‘Fiesta’ Show and Sale, 2018 [Graeme Barclay].jpg- is missing! Notes and photos from the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand’s annual ‘Fiesta’ Show and Sale, 2018
    Graeme Barclay
The annual competitive show and major sale of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, known as the ‘Fiesta’, takes place in mid February each year in Auckland, the largest city in the North Island of New Zealand. In this year 2018, the dates were February 17th and 18th, with the usual city council War Memorial Hall in Mount Eden (a central city suburb) hired for three days. Friday was set-up day for the plant show, bromeliad display and sales tables, then the doors open to visitors from 9am to 3pm on both Saturday and Sunday.
JBS_68(3): 132-133 (PDF/A 576 KBytes) published online: September 09 2019
image -JBS_68(3)132-133 World Bromeliad Conference 2020, Sarasota, Florida [Greg Kolojeski and Marion Kennell].jpg- is missing! World Bromeliad Conference 2020, Sarasota, Florida
    Greg Kolojeski and Marion Kennell
The World Bromeliad Conference 2020 will be held in Sarasota, Florida, USA from Tuesday, June 9, 2020 through Saturday, June 13, 2020 at the Hyatt Regency Sarasota. We will celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the Bromeliad Society International! Events will include tours of two of the world’s leading Bromeliad nurseries (Michael’s Bromeliads and Tropiflora) and a visit to the renowned Marie Selby Botanical Gardens (with free admission for conference registrants) home garden visits and much more.
JBS_68(3): 105-168 (PDF/A 2900 KBytes) published online: September 04 2019
image -JBS_68(3)105-168 World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 1 [Juliana Raposo].jpg- is missing! World Bromeliad Conference 2018, San Diego - Part 1
    Juliana Raposo
May 2018 - The World Bromeliad Conference 2018 was hosted by the San Diego Bromeliad Society (SDBS). This was the third WBC hosted by San Diego after hosting similar events in 1994 and 2006. Our logo (Fig. 1), featuring a Neoregelia, became a constant part of our lives during the months of preparation. The venue was Paradise Point, a tropical-themed island resort in the middle of San Diego Bay. A lush landscape, bay views (Fig. 2), and beautiful outdoor spaces set BSI’s bi-annual gathering to a great start. All social functions and lectures were held in a great room facing the bay, and the large deck surrounding it was the perfect spot to mingle. The adjacent sales and show pavilion, a large tent-like structure, was bathed in natural light and ocean breezes (Fig. 3). There was plenty of room for vendors and show displays alike.
JBS (PDF/A 709 KBytes) published online: July 09 2019
image -JBS 68(3) The Floridian Fasciculata [Dennis Cathcart].jpg- is missing! 68(3) The Floridian Fasciculata
    Dennis Cathcart
Tillandsia fasciculata is a plant of stunning diversity with an impressive international range. Many, many differentlooking forms exist, some restricted to single habitats. Some forms are so widespread that one would be hard pressed to guess their country of origin. Not so the Floridian fasciculata. Any Tillandsia enthusiast could likely identify a plant from Florida. They are among the most beautiful and variable representatives of the species found anywhere ...
JBS (PDF/A 929 KBytes) published online: July 12 2019
image -JBS 68(3) Notes on the Androlepis Alliance, a lineage of Bromelioideae [Ramirez et al.].jpg- is missing! 68(3) Notes on the Androlepis Alliance, a lineage of Bromelioideae
    Ramirez et al.
Before the advent of DNA sequencing, classifications of plants in general, and of Bromeliaceae in particular, were primarily based on morphological characters observed in herbarium specimens (e.g. Smith & Downs, 1974, 1977, 1979). These classification systems were easy to use because they tended to be based on macroscopic features, such as shapes of floral bracts, sepals, and presence or absence of petal appendages. With the advance of methods for phylogenetic reconstruction and relying on different character sources, especially DNA sequences, we realize, that many of the groupings based solely upon conspicuous morphological features resulted in many artificial classifications, composed by species that do not share a recent common ancestors and have different evolutionary histories (what are known as non-monophyletic groups) (Faria et al., 2004; Schulte et al., 2005, 2009; Schulte & Zizka, 2008; Sass & Specht, 2010; Evans et al., 2015). It is well known that morphological similarities could result from different phenomena, such as evolutionary convergence, where identical or almost identical structures occur in species with different evolutionary histories. This phenomenon, which has probably taken place many times in bromeliads, coupled with the limited knowledge that we have about the origin of many structures used in the taxonomic classifications, are some of the problems that obscure our classifications based on monophyletic groups.
JBS (PDF/A 818 KBytes) published online: June 29 2019
image -JBS 68(3) A New Species of Racinaea (Tillandsioideae - Bromeliaceae) from Ecuador [Jose Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(3) A New Species of Racinaea (Tillandsioideae - Bromeliaceae) from Ecuador
    Jose Manzanares
Forestry engineer Nelson Jaramillo de Loja conducted his undergraduate researchon the emission of methane through bromeliad tanks at the San Francisco ResearchStation, Zamora Chinchipe, Ecuador. During the investigation he had the opportunityto study many bromeliads from the Scientific Station. When contacting me toidentify the species studied, I was struck by a species of Racinaea related to R. lutheriManzanares & Till and R. contorta (Mez) M.A.Spencer & L.B.Sm. After further study,the plant collected by Jaramillo, it turned out to be a new species that is presented andillustrated in the following article....
JBS (PDF/A 1025 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)78-85 Studies on Hechtioideae A Story of Love and Hate [Ivon Ramirez].jpg- is missing! 68(2)78-85 Studies on Hechtioideae A Story of Love and Hate
    Ivon Ramirez
I had the honor to be invited to speak at the 2018 World Bromeliad Conference in San Diego, California, along with other colleagues with interesting and enriching talks. My presentation in particular focused on the way people who classify plants work. I used my study group, Hechtia, as a way to illustrate the steps we follow in our research. Thus, here is the story. Bromeliaceae, as you know, is a Neotropical group in its natural distribution regardless of its presence around the World, where it is cultivated for the beauty of its species. Plant taxonomists like myself, study and identify them. We are also interested, besides assigning correct names to each species, in many other biological and evolutionary features: how they evolved, what characters have changed along their evolutionary history, where they come from, etc., just as we are concerned about our own origins and from whom we inherited some features, such as our nose, eye color, or even our bad temper!
JBS (PDF/A 744 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)73-77 A New Species of Racinaea [Jose M. Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(2)73-77 A New Species of Racinaea
    Jose M. Manzanares
In 1996 I had the opportunity to study the forest of the Cordillera de los Guacamayos thanks to PROBONA (Programa Regional de Bosques Nativos Andinos). The principal objective was to make the inventory of the Bromeliaceae and to see the possibilities of growing the most ornamental ones for sale to get funds to preserve the forest. During the same expedition we also found a new Guzmania which we named after de Director of PROBONA, Javier Izko, Guzmania izkoi Manzanares & W. Till published in the J. Bromeliad Soc. 50(1): 17-19 (2000).
JBS (PDF/A 817 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)68-72 A new variety of Guzmania conglomerata from Colombia [Eric J. Gouda and Jeffrey Kent].jpg- is missing! 68(2)68-72 A new variety of Guzmania conglomerata from Colombia
    Eric J. Gouda and Jeffrey Kent
There are about 218 species and 25 infraspecific taxa recognized in Guzmania at present (Gouda cont. upd.) Many were described as new over the last 30 years, especially by the late Harry Luther (56 species, which is ca. 25% of the total number known today) in the last 10 years, often together with Karen Norton. Locating primary forest is becoming increasingly difficult in the western Andes of Colombia. Fortunately, since the termination of the Colombian Civil War, areas which were occupied by the FARC and the ELN are now available for exploration after nearly 50 years. In one such niche, we were able to find this new form of Guzmania conglomerata alongside the road without much hiking.
JBS (PDF/A 11533 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)28-40 Treasure hunting in Peru part 3 [Eric and Renate Gouda].jpg- is missing! 68(2)28-40 Treasure hunting in Peru part 3
    Eric and Renate Gouda
After a day or two in Cajamarca we took a bus to Celendin to find a way to get to the very small place Balsas where we wanted to search for Tillandsia balsasensis. In Celendin we took a so called “collectivo” - any form of transportation with a driver willing to sell space in the vehicle for people and their property. We found a station wagon that would take us where we wanted. The chauffeur, as always, tried to get as many people with their goods in as possible, and went far beyond the limits of what we considered to be safe and acceptable. At last, after an hour or two, we took off with fewer people than he wanted, because we just did not let them in. We would have left the car if the driver had insisted on adding more passengers. When we arrived at Balsas he asked us if this was really the place we wanted to stay and we did.
JBS (PDF/A 586 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)124 Another note on Guzmania sanguinea [Alan Herndon].jpg- is missing! 68(2)124 Another note on Guzmania sanguinea
    Alan Herndon
The clone of Guzmania sanguinea comosa grown by Karl Green (left) consisently has white petal tips that remain erect and stick out only 3 mm beyond the sepals. Stigma and anthers are included. The other three clones grown by Karl (including G. sanguinea brevipedicillata, below and bottom left) consistently have petal tips that push out much futher beyond the sepal tips with the Is this kind of variation in flowers widespread in Guzmania sanguinea?
JBS (PDF/A 945 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)116-123 2018 Bromeliad Society of South Florida Show [Alan Herndon].jpg- is missing! 68(2)116-123 2018 Bromeliad Society of South Florida Show
    Alan Herndon
In 2018, the Bromeliad Society of South Florida (BSSF) held its 40th Annual Show and Sale a month earlier than has been . The usual schedule was followed with setup on Thursday (22 March), Judging on Friday (23 March), and the show open to the public over the weekend (24-25 March). As much as I would like to give a full report on the Art Show that runs in parallel with our Plant Show, I have never been able to get photos to illustrate such a report. The plant show is my responsibility and it is enough of a job that I am totally unable to take usable pictures of anything during the show and afterwards too exhausted to ask others for photos they might have of the student art. In any case, as you read the following account of the plant show, please remember that it is only half of what is going on.
JBS (PDF/A 1305 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)107-114 Cultivation of Racinaea fraseri in Ecuador [Jose Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(2)107-114 Cultivation of Racinaea fraseri in Ecuador
    Jose Manzanares
In Ecuador Racinaea fraseri is known as “pata de paloma”, which means pigeon’s foot. This bromeliad is native to the dry forests of Ecuador, southern Colombia and northern Peru, and can be found along streams and in forest remnants. It flowers naturally in the months of July and August, which are the driest and windiest months of the year, especially in the dry valleys. It remains in flower until the end of the year when seed production begins. Seed matures in the months of July and August of the following year. Propagation is by buds that develop at the base of the peduncle which allows them to form stems, sometimes up to 1 m long. But the main system of reproduction is by seed, which produces new plants and increases their numbers in habitat.

Accessed from 12-03-2018 [1406x]
Send comments, corrections and suggestions to: webmaster@bsi.org
(c) 2019 Bromeliad Society International, All Rights Reserved.
All images copyrighted BSI or their respective owners.