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The following articles will be published in the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

JBS (PDF/A 1025 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)78-85 Studies on Hechtioideae A Story of Love and Hate [Ivon Ramirez].jpg- is missing! 68(2)78-85 Studies on Hechtioideae A Story of Love and Hate
    Ivon Ramirez
I had the honor to be invited to speak at the 2018 World Bromeliad Conference in San Diego, California, along with other colleagues with interesting and enriching talks. My presentation in particular focused on the way people who classify plants work. I used my study group, Hechtia, as a way to illustrate the steps we follow in our research. Thus, here is the story. Bromeliaceae, as you know, is a Neotropical group in its natural distribution regardless of its presence around the World, where it is cultivated for the beauty of its species. Plant taxonomists like myself, study and identify them. We are also interested, besides assigning correct names to each species, in many other biological and evolutionary features: how they evolved, what characters have changed along their evolutionary history, where they come from, etc., just as we are concerned about our own origins and from whom we inherited some features, such as our nose, eye color, or even our bad temper!
JBS (PDF/A 744 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)73-77 A New Species of Racinaea [Jose M. Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(2)73-77 A New Species of Racinaea
    Jose M. Manzanares
In 1996 I had the opportunity to study the forest of the Cordillera de los Guacamayos thanks to PROBONA (Programa Regional de Bosques Nativos Andinos). The principal objective was to make the inventory of the Bromeliaceae and to see the possibilities of growing the most ornamental ones for sale to get funds to preserve the forest. During the same expedition we also found a new Guzmania which we named after de Director of PROBONA, Javier Izko, Guzmania izkoi Manzanares & W. Till published in the J. Bromeliad Soc. 50(1): 17-19 (2000).
JBS (PDF/A 817 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)68-72 A new variety of Guzmania conglomerata from Colombia [Eric J. Gouda and Jeffrey Kent].jpg- is missing! 68(2)68-72 A new variety of Guzmania conglomerata from Colombia
    Eric J. Gouda and Jeffrey Kent
There are about 218 species and 25 infraspecific taxa recognized in Guzmania at present (Gouda cont. upd.) Many were described as new over the last 30 years, especially by the late Harry Luther (56 species, which is ca. 25% of the total number known today) in the last 10 years, often together with Karen Norton. Locating primary forest is becoming increasingly difficult in the western Andes of Colombia. Fortunately, since the termination of the Colombian Civil War, areas which were occupied by the FARC and the ELN are now available for exploration after nearly 50 years. In one such niche, we were able to find this new form of Guzmania conglomerata alongside the road without much hiking.
JBS (PDF/A 11533 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)28-40 Treasure hunting in Peru part 3 [Eric and Renate Gouda].jpg- is missing! 68(2)28-40 Treasure hunting in Peru part 3
    Eric and Renate Gouda
After a day or two in Cajamarca we took a bus to Celendin to find a way to get to the very small place Balsas where we wanted to search for Tillandsia balsasensis. In Celendin we took a so called “collectivo” - any form of transportation with a driver willing to sell space in the vehicle for people and their property. We found a station wagon that would take us where we wanted. The chauffeur, as always, tried to get as many people with their goods in as possible, and went far beyond the limits of what we considered to be safe and acceptable. At last, after an hour or two, we took off with fewer people than he wanted, because we just did not let them in. We would have left the car if the driver had insisted on adding more passengers. When we arrived at Balsas he asked us if this was really the place we wanted to stay and we did.
JBS (PDF/A 586 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)124 Another note on Guzmania sanguinea [Alan Herndon].jpg- is missing! 68(2)124 Another note on Guzmania sanguinea
    Alan Herndon
The clone of Guzmania sanguinea comosa grown by Karl Green (left) consisently has white petal tips that remain erect and stick out only 3 mm beyond the sepals. Stigma and anthers are included. The other three clones grown by Karl (including G. sanguinea brevipedicillata, below and bottom left) consistently have petal tips that push out much futher beyond the sepal tips with the Is this kind of variation in flowers widespread in Guzmania sanguinea?
JBS (PDF/A 945 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)116-123 2018 Bromeliad Society of South Florida Show [Alan Herndon].jpg- is missing! 68(2)116-123 2018 Bromeliad Society of South Florida Show
    Alan Herndon
In 2018, the Bromeliad Society of South Florida (BSSF) held its 40th Annual Show and Sale a month earlier than has been . The usual schedule was followed with setup on Thursday (22 March), Judging on Friday (23 March), and the show open to the public over the weekend (24-25 March). As much as I would like to give a full report on the Art Show that runs in parallel with our Plant Show, I have never been able to get photos to illustrate such a report. The plant show is my responsibility and it is enough of a job that I am totally unable to take usable pictures of anything during the show and afterwards too exhausted to ask others for photos they might have of the student art. In any case, as you read the following account of the plant show, please remember that it is only half of what is going on.
JBS (PDF/A 1305 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2)107-114 Cultivation of Racinaea fraseri in Ecuador [Jose Manzanares].jpg- is missing! 68(2)107-114 Cultivation of Racinaea fraseri in Ecuador
    Jose Manzanares
In Ecuador Racinaea fraseri is known as “pata de paloma”, which means pigeon’s foot. This bromeliad is native to the dry forests of Ecuador, southern Colombia and northern Peru, and can be found along streams and in forest remnants. It flowers naturally in the months of July and August, which are the driest and windiest months of the year, especially in the dry valleys. It remains in flower until the end of the year when seed production begins. Seed matures in the months of July and August of the following year. Propagation is by buds that develop at the base of the peduncle which allows them to form stems, sometimes up to 1 m long. But the main system of reproduction is by seed, which produces new plants and increases their numbers in habitat.
JBS (PDF/A 4517 KBytes) published online: March 09 2019
image -JBS 68(2) for review copy.jpg- is missing! 68(2) for review
    BS 68(2) for review copy

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