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The following electronic published articles are accepted to be included the Journal soon. You can read them before the Journal is published, as an extra service for members. Be aware that right now, any individual article posted before printing may look substantially different in the printed edition and the issue number is only an indication. Be sure to be a follower of our facebook page to be noticed of new articles published online. If you see any typos before printing, please contact the Editor. You have to login first, to have access to the PDF files, click here.

69(2c pp. 5) (PDF/A 3227 KBytes) published online: April 22 2020
image 69(2c pp. 5).jpg is missing! Airplant Aerialists on the High-Wire
    Bruce Holst
Circus tightrope artists do their best to remain in contact with the wire -- their goal is staying alive while making a living and entertaining crowds. With tightrope plant artists, their goal is finding a niche to grow and reproduce. Bromeliads are masters of the high-wire, and to my knowledge, the only group of vascular plants that can maintain a perch on wire lines high in the air well enough to flower and set seeds that then drift on the air currents to new perches, be-it wire or wood. The Tillandsioideae are the best skilled aerialists, being mostly represented on high wires by atmospheric tillandsias or air-plants, though small tank-forming species of Tillandsia and Catopsis have also been observed on wires.

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